A Tramway Called Atonement: Genealogies of Infrastructure and Emerging Political Imaginaries in Contemporary Casablanca

  • Cristiana Strava Leiden University
Keywords: Morocco, infrastructure, mobility, affect, political imaginaries

Abstract

This article explores the role of infrastructure in the production of post-colonial political imaginaries linked to mobility and expectations of social justice. I focus on how the building of the Casablanca tramway opened up new ways for engaging in political commentary and participation for a segment of the city that frequently lacks the direct means for accessing power. In the process, the aim is to contribute a brief account of the historical genealogies behind such projects and argue for an understanding of infrastructure as a site for the production of future aspirations and political engagement for marginalized communities.

Author Biography

Cristiana Strava, Leiden University

is Assistant Professor in Middle Eastern and International Studies at the Leiden Institute for Area Studies (LIAS), Leiden University. As a social anthropologist, she has worked on the transformation of urban and social spaces in Morocco in particular, and is interested in the dynamics of social change in the region more generally. Her most recent project focused on the relationship between urban space, regulatory regimes, and the criminalization of lower class bodies and practices as part of an increasingly neoliberal socio-political landscape in Morocco.

Published
2018-06-14
How to Cite
Strava, C. “A Tramway Called Atonement: Genealogies of Infrastructure and Emerging Political Imaginaries in Contemporary Casablanca”. Middle East - Topics & Arguments, Vol. 10, June 2018, pp. 22-29, doi:10.17192/meta.2018.10.7590.
Section
Anti/Thesis