Worlding Cities in the Middle East and North Africa – Arguments for a Conceptual Turn

Autor/innen

  • Raffael Beier Institute of Development Research and Development Policy, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany and International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9772-2293

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.17192/meta.2019.12.7828

Schlagworte:

Worlding, Megaprojects, Urban Planning, Urban Policy

Abstract

This article suggest analyzing megaprojects in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region as worlding practices, hence, as a way to influence emerging countries’ own status of being in the world. This analytical lens differs from traditional perspectives that have tried to identify regional particularities such as the influence of Gulf countries and an authoritarian way of planning. Seeing megaprojects as worlding aspirations, instead, helps to see them embedded in a wider global context, stressing the post-colonial and developmental dimension of this significant planning trend. It further allows emphasizing interactions with other urban policies such as slum resettlement.

Autor/innen-Biografie

Raffael Beier, Institute of Development Research and Development Policy, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany and International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

is an urban geographer and research fellow at the Institute of Development Research and Development Policy, Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany. He is further affiliated with the International Institute of Social Studies, Erasmus-University Rotterdam, The Netherlands. His research mostly relates to topics of urban inequality, housing, public transport infrastructure, and urban resistance, with a focus on Egypt, Tunisia, and Morocco. In his PhD project, he has analyzed the effects of resettlement on livelihood and living practices of displaced shantytown dwellers in Casablanca. 

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Veröffentlicht

2019-06-25

Zitationsvorschlag

Beier, R. „Worlding Cities in the Middle East and North Africa – Arguments for a Conceptual Turn“. Middle East - Topics &Amp; Arguments, Bd. 12, Nr. 1, Juni 2019, S. 28-34, doi:10.17192/meta.2019.12.7828.

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Anti/Thesis